AT A GLANCE

  • Hiring in the Midwest is expected to improve in the third quarter of 2013
  • Wisconsin was at the 43rd position among all states in employment gain in the 3rd quarter of 2013
  • 52% of employers feel that the biggest issue facing companies in the first quarter of 2013 was the economy, followed by a lack of qualified employees at 46%

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Jun 01, 2013

Midwest Businesses Optimistic about Hiring in 2013

According to a survey conducted by a recruiting agency based in Wisconsin, hiring in the Midwest is expected to improve in the next three months. The survey was administered to 320 manufacturers, banks, printers, distributers and information technology firms based in the Midwestern United States. 

According to the Quarterly Census on Wages and Employment report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics,, Wisconsin was at the 43rd position among all states in employment gain in the 3rd quarter of 2012. It also ranked 44th out of 50 states in private-sector job creation. An explanation for this ranking can be found by examining the main industries of the area, which have been hard-hit over the past few years. No American state produces more paper than Wisconsin, and the declining demand for ink-on-paper publishing has negatively affected paper mills and contract printing plants with many of them closing down. In addition, the downturn in real estate has caused many factories producing windows, doors and home construction supplies to suffer. 

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Employer Sentiments on the Mid-West

Employer Sentiments on the Mid-West

According to the survey, 455 employers have open positions due to a lack of skilled workers.  52% of employers feel that the biggest issue facing companies in the first quarter of 2013 was the economy, followed by a lack of qualified employees at 46%. 

Asked about overall business climate, 48% expect conditions to improve and only 3% expect conditions to worsen. Most employers (69%) expected wages to stay the same, while 30% percent expected an increase. Of the percentage that expected an increase in wages, 53% predict a 2.1 to 4% increase, while 44% expect an increase of less than 2%.

“This doesn’t just change overnight. It’s a product of our history. We are not doomed to slow growth, it’s just that it’s going to take time” ~Brian Jacobsen, economist at Wells Fargo Bank.

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